Understand, create, exploit and take full advantage of disorder | Mi Portería

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Methodology

Order is not particularly hard or complex, what is truly complex is to understand, create, exploit and take full advantage of disorder

“I love disorder!” This is a Pepe Peñarroja’s statement that show us an extremely attractive philosophy. As a goalkeeping coach, have you ever considered how many opportunities offers this statement?

You may not know me, but I going to humbly show you my truth. I might be a completely stranger to you, but I strongly believe in the good value of this situation, since it will give me the chance to make my point and not be prejudged for being who I am.

I will start getting straight to the point with an unpopular opinion: I LOVE DISORDER!

For those who are uncertain about this statement, or do not know what my truly intentions are when I say this to the readers, I will tell you that causing disorder in the opponent, even in ourselves, is a sign that something very useful can happen where I come from (football).

According to the RAE dictionary, disorder is to disrupt the systematic functioning of something or to create confusion. I will never stand for the kind of disorder that it is not built from order or planning: the aim is to cause confusion and outsmart the opponent. It is key to understand that, the same way opposite poles never go separately, disorder can only exist with a previous order.

Tactical disorder varies depending on whether it is of your own making (with a clear objective to open and create spaces to outsmart the opponent), or whether it is provoked to counteract the opponent (depending on the tactical set up the opposition team employs to score a goal).

You will better understand my point of view if I explain my way of seeing football: it is all about space and time, that is the one and only truth. Both teams seek open spaces, and time to make the best decisions over those spaces. This can result in certain opponent’s movements (or not) and in case they try to avoid being surpassed, it may lead to more open spaces and more time in other areas of the playing field.

Game Tactics help identify in which areas of the pitch the team will have more options to create superiority or in which areas the team will be more vulnerable, but is in the movements of the real protagonists (the players) whose decision making will create the necessary tactical disarray on the field to surpass the opponent.

We must minimise risks, not by limiting the area in which we seek space and time superiority, but by improving the coaching sessions, paying attention to scenarios in which the players should make decisions and help them understand the game.

It is funny how the uncontrollable, the automatised, the unexpected, what is created thanks to the understanding of the game, has become the most attractive feature in one of the most seen regulated structured and controlled sports in the world. Thanks to that orderly disorder we can enjoy a sport that could become dull if we took our precious DISORDER out of the equation.

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